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Private Property of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida.
This medical policy (medical coverage guideline) is Copyright 2015, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSF). All Rights Reserved. You may not copy or use this document or disclose its contents without the express written permission of BCBSF. The medical codes referenced in this document may be proprietary and owned by others. BCBSF makes no claim of ownership of such codes. Our use of such codes in this document is for explanation and guidance and should not be construed as a license for their use by you. Before utilizing the codes, please be sure that to the extent required, you have secured any appropriate licenses for such use. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. No fee schedules, basic units, relative values, or related listings are included in CPT. The AMA assumes no liability for the data contained herein. Applicable FARS/DFARS restrictions apply to government use. CPT® is a trademark of the American Medical Association. The use of specific product names is illustrative only. It is not intended to be a recommendation of one product over another, and is not intended to represent a complete listing of all products available.

01-93875-18

Original Effective Date: 06/15/02

Reviewed: 08/27/15

Revised: 11/01/15

Subject: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

THIS MEDICAL COVERAGE GUIDELINE IS NOT AN AUTHORIZATION, CERTIFICATION, EXPLANATION OF BENEFITS, OR A GUARANTEE OF PAYMENT, NOR DOES IT SUBSTITUTE FOR OR CONSTITUTE MEDICAL ADVICE. ALL MEDICAL DECISIONS ARE SOLELY THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PATIENT AND PHYSICIAN. BENEFITS ARE DETERMINED BY THE GROUP CONTRACT, MEMBER BENEFIT BOOKLET, AND/OR INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER CERTIFICATE IN EFFECT AT THE TIME SERVICES WERE RENDERED. THIS MEDICAL COVERAGE GUIDELINE APPLIES TO ALL LINES OF BUSINESS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN THE PROGRAM EXCEPTIONS SECTION.

           
Position Statement Billing/Coding Reimbursement Program Exceptions Definitions Related Guidelines
           
Other References Updates    
           

DESCRIPTION:

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method of delivering electrical stimulation to the brain. A magnetic field is delivered through the skull where it induces electric currents that affect neuronal function. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) is being evaluated as a treatment of depression and other psychiatric/neurologic brain disorders. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (2012), a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed magnetic fields of sufficient magnitude to induce neural action potentials in the prefrontal cortex to treat the symptoms of major depressive disorder without inducing seizure in patients who have failed at least one antidepressant medication and are currently not on any antidepressant therapy. Also, navigating transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is being evaluated as a treatment for neurological disorders.

TMS was initially used to investigate nerve conduction; for example, TMS over the motor cortex will produce a contralateral muscular-evoked potential.The technique involves placement of a small coil over the scalp; a rapidly alternating current is passed through the coil wire, which produces a magnetic field that passes unimpeded through the scalp and bone, resulting in electrical stimulation of the cortex.

Interest in the use of TMS as a treatment for depression was augmented by the development of a device that could deliver rapid, repetitive stimulation. Imaging studies had shown a decrease in activity of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in depressed patients, and early studies suggested that high frequency (e.g., 5–10 Hz) TMS of the left DLPFC had antidepressant effects. Low frequency (1–2 Hz) stimulation of the right DLPFC has also been investigated. The rationale for low frequency TMS is inhibition of right frontal cortical activity to correct the interhemispheric imbalance. A combination approach (bilateral stimulation), or deep stimulation with an H1 coil, are also being explored. In contrast to electroconvulsive therapy, TMS can be performed in an office setting as it does not require anesthesia and does not induce a convulsion.

rTMS is also being tested as a treatment for other disorders including, but not limited to alcohol dependence, Alzheimer’s disease, neuropathic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-partum depression, Parkinson disease, stroke, posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, epilepsy, dysphagia, Tourette’s syndrome, schizophrenia, migraine, spinal cord injury, fibromyalgia, and tinnitus.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices, NeuroStar® TMS Therapy System (Neuronetics, Inc) and Brainsway Deep TMS System (Brainsway Ltd.) have received clearance for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The NeuroStar® TMS Therapy System is indicated for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in adult patients who have failed to achieve satisfactory improvement from one prior antidepressant medication at or above the minimal effective dose and duration in the current episode. The Brainsway Deep TMS System is indicated for treatment of depressive episodes in adult patients suffering from Major Depressive Disorder who failed to achieve satisfactory improvement from previous anti-depressant medication treatment in the current episode.

For exclusions and training and other requirements for TMS, see OTHER section of this guideline.

Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (nTMS)

Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is being studied as a diagnostic tool to stimulate functional cortical areas at precise anatomical locations to induce measurable responses. This technology is being investigated to map functionally essential motor areas for diagnostic purposes and for treatment planning. There is some evidence in the medical literature for nTMS as an evolving technique for mapping of brain function.

POSITION STATEMENT:

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) (including repetitive TMS (rTMS)) of the brain administered with an FDA approved device meets the definition of medical necessity as a treatment of major depressive disorder in adults when ALL of the following criteria (1-3) have been met:

1. Confirmed diagnosis of severe major depressive disorder (single or recurrent without the psychosis) documented by one *standardized evidence based depression rating scale (Table 1) that reliably measure depressive symptoms (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Clinician-rated (IDS-C), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-reported (QIDS-SR), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9)); AND

2. The member is between the age of 18 and 70 and is not actively abusing substances (urine drug screening (UDS) confirmation may be required) and has any one of the following (a, b, c, or d):

a. Failure of 4 trials of psychopharmacologic agents including 2 different agent classes and 2 augmentation trials; OR

b. Inability to tolerate a therapeutic dose of medications as evidenced by 4 trials of psychopharmacologic agents with distinct intolerable side effects; OR

c. History of response to TMS in a previous depressive episode (at least 3 months since the prior episode); OR

d. Is a candidate for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and ECT outcome would not be overall superior to TMS (e.g., in cases with psychosis, acute suicidal risk, catatonia, or life-threating inanition TMS should not be utilized); AND

3. Failure of a trial of an evidenced based psychotherapy (e.g., CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy), IPT (interpersonal therapy)) known to be effective in the treatment of major depression (of an adequate frequency and duration), without significant improvement in depressive symptoms, as documented by *standardized evidence based depression rating scales that reliably measure depressive symptoms (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Clinician-rated (IDS-C), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-reported (QIDS-SR), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9)); AND

4. A treatment course of TMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex should not exceed 5 days a week for 6 weeks (total of 30 sessions), followed by a 3 week taper of 3 TMS treatments in week 1; 2 TMS treatments the next week, and; 1 TMS treatment in the last week. Initial authorization will be for 1 unit of 90867; 19 units of 90868. Concurrent authorization will be for 16 units of 90868, and 1 unit of 90869 with medical documentation.

*Note: Standardized depression rating scale (Table 1) should be performed during the entire TMS treatment course to monitor progress; at a minimal frequency of an initial pre-treatment test, followed by testing every 2 weeks and a final test at the last treatment visit. The scores will be required for concurrent authorization.

Table 1

Depression Rating Scale

Number Items

Minimum Score for Initial Authorization

Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

21

>29

Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Clinician-rated (IDS-C)

30

>36

Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology Self-reported (QIDS-SR)

16

>15

Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)

10

>34

Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9)

9

>19

For required documentation, refer to the REIMBURSEMENT INFORMATION section of this guideline.

For exclusions and training and other requirements for TMS, see OTHER section of this guideline.

Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is considered experimental or investigational for all indications, including but not limited to brain mapping because the scientific evidence does not permit conclusions concerning the effect of nTMS on treatment planning and health outcomes.

BILLING/CODING INFORMATION:

The following codes may be used to describe transcranial magnetic stimulation.

CPT Coding:

90867

Therapeutic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment; initial, including cortical mapping, motor threshold determination, delivery and management

90868

Therapeutic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment; subsequent delivery and management, per session

90869

Therapeutic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment; subsequent motor threshold re-determination with delivery and management

Code 90867; do not report more than one time for each course of treatment. Do not report 90867 with (90868, 90869, 95860-95870, 95928, 95929, 95939).

Code 90869; do not report with (90867,-90868, 95860-95870, 95928-95929, 95939).

Refer to section entitled POSITION STATEMENT.

REIMBURSEMENT INFORMATION:

The primary treating physician may be required to submit documentation for the member, which supports the criteria for TMS in the POSITION STATEMENT of this guideline.

Refer to section entitled POSITION STATEMENT.

LOINC Codes:

The following information may be required documentation to support medical necessity: physician history and physical, physician progress notes, plan of treatment and reason for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

Documentation Table

LOINC Codes

LOINC
Time Frame
Modifier Code

LOINC Time Frame Modifier Codes Narrative

Physician history and physical

28626-0

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim

Attending physician visit note

18733-6

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

Attending physician progress note

18741-9

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

Plan of treatment

18776-5

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

Laboratory studies

26436-6

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim

Current, discharge, or administered medications

34483-8

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

PROGRAM EXCEPTIONS:

Coverage for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) (including repetitive TMS (rTMS)) referenced in this guideline performed and billed in an outpatient or office location will be handled through New Directions Behavioral Health® for select products. New Directions Behavioral Health will determine coverage for these services for select products. Refer to member's contract benefits.

Federal Employee Program (FEP): Follow FEP guidelines.

State Account Organization (SAO): Follow SAO guidelines.

Medicare Advantage Products: The following Local Coverage Determination (LCD) Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Major Depressive Disorder (L33676) is located at fcso.com.

DEFINITIONS:

Major depression: a combination of symptoms (e.g., persistent sad, anxious, or “empty feelings, hopelessness or pessimism, difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions) that are disabling and prevents an individual from functioning normally.

RELATED GUIDELINES:

None applicable.

OTHER:

NOTE: The use of specific product names is illustrative only. It is not intended to be a recommendation of one product over another, and is not intended to represent a complete listing of all products available.

Other names used to report transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain:

Brain stimulation therapy
Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS)
NeoPulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Repetitive TMS (rTMS)

Exclusions:

  1. The member has no non removable metallic objects or implants in his/her head or neck regions.
  2. The member has an active neurologic disorder, including but not limited to encephalopathy, dementia form any cause, Parkinson’s Disease, post-stroke syndromes, increased intracranial pressure or bleeding, cerebral aneurysm, A-V malformations, CSF shunts, Implants in the CNS or head, etc.
  3. The member has no evidence of active psychotic symptoms.

Training and Other Requirements:

  1. The attending physician is a board certified psychiatrist with training in the use of TMS in Major Depression.
  2. The attending physician is required to perform TMS treatment (code 90867 and 90869).
  3. A technician may perform TMS treatment (code 90868) (under direct supervision of the attending physician); the technician performing TMS treatment (code 90868) is required to have certification in performing TMS treatment (code 90868).
  4. New Directions Behavioral Health will register clinics or practitioners via documentation of certification, prior to determining coverage for TMS.

REFERENCES:

  1. Al-Harbi KS. Treatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions. Patient Prefer Adherence 2012; 6: 369-388.
  2. Allan CL, Herrmann LL, Ebmeier KP. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the management of mood disorders. Neuropsychobiology 2011; 64(3):163-169.
  3. Avery DH, Isenberg KE, Sampson SM et al. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the acute treatment of major depressive disorder: clinical response in an open-label extension trial. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2008; 69(3): 441-451.
  4. Bauer M, Bschor T, Pfennig A et al. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Unipolar Depressive Disorders in Primary Care. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry 2007; 8(2): 67-104.
  5. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Medical Policy Reference Manual Transcranial magnetic stimulation as a treatment of depression (2.01.50), 12/14.
  6. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center (TEC). Transcranial magnetic stimulation for depression. TEC Assessment 2014; Vol. 28, No. 9.
  7. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center (TEC). Transcranial magnetic stimulation for depression. TEC Assessment 2011; Vol. 26, No. 5.
  8. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center (TEC). Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of schizophrenia. TEC Assessment 2011; Vol. 26, No. 6.
  9. ECRI Emerging Technology Evidence Report. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Using the NeuroStar System for Treating Major Depressive Disorder, April 2012.
  10. Eranti S, Mogg A, Pluck G et al. A randomized controlled trial with 6-month follow-up repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive therapy for severe depression. American Journal of Psychiatry 2007; 164(1): 73-81.
  11. First Coast Service Options LCD Transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depressive disorder L33676, 07/07/14.
  12. Fitzgerald PB, Benitez J, de Castella A, Daskalakis ZJ, Brown TL, Kulkarni J. A randomized, controlled trial of sequential bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression. Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Jan; 163(1): 88-94.
  13. Fochtmann LJ and Gelenberg AJ. Guideline Watch: Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder, 2nd Edition. FOCUS: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry, Vol. 3, No. 1 Winter 2005:34-42.
  14. Gaynes BN, Lux L, Lloyd S. et al. Nonpharmacologic interventions for treatment-resistant depression in adults. Comparative effectiveness Review No. 33. AHRQ Publication No. 11-EHC056-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Sept 2011.
  15. Gelenberg AJ, freeman MP, Markowitz JC et al. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder, third edition, approved May 2010 and published Oct 2010.
  16. George MS, Lisanby SH, Avery D, et al. Daily left prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy for major depressive disorder: a sham-controlled randomized trial. Archives of General Psychiatry 2010; 67(5):507-516.
  17. George MS, Post RM. Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for acute treatment of medication-resistant depression. Treatment in Psychiatry 2011; 168(4): 356-364.
  18. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI). Major depression in adults for mental health care. Bloomington (MN): Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI); 2004 May. 52 p.
  19. Janicak PG, Dunner DL, Aaronson ST et al. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for major depression: a multisite, naturalistic, observational study of quality of life outcome measures in clinical practice. CNS Spectrum 2013; 18(6): 322-332.
  20. Janicak PG, Nahas Z, Lisanby SH et al. Durability of clinical benefit with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of pharmacoresistant major depression: assessment of relapse during a 6-month, multisite, open-label study. Brain Stimulation 2010; 3(4); 187-199.
  21. Janicak PG, O’Reardon JP, Sampson SM et al. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a comprehensive summary of safety experience from acute exposure, extended exposure, and during reintroduction treatment. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2008; 69(2): 222-232.
  22. Jorge RE, Moser DJ, Acion L et al. Treatment of vascular depression using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation Archives of General Psychiatry 2008; 65(3): 268-276.
  23. Kennedy SH, Milev R, Giacobbe P et al. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Clinical guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder in adults. IV. Neurostimulation therapies. Journal of Affective Disorders 2009; 114: S44-S53.
  24. Kobayashi M, Pascual-Leone A. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in neurology. Lancet Neurol. 2003; 2(3): 145-156.
  25. Lam RW, Chan P, Wilkins-Ho M et al. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a systematic review and metaanalysis Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 2008; 53(9): 621-631.
  26. Martin JL, Barbanoj MJ, Schlaepfer TE et al. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of depression. Systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Psychiatry 2003; 182: 480-491.
  27. Martin JLR, Barbanoj MJ, Pérez V, Sacristán M. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD003387. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003387.
  28. Martin JLR, Barbanoj MJ, Schlaepfer TE, Clos S, Perez V, Kulisevsky J, Gironell, A. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treating depression. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2001, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003493. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003493.
  29. McLoughlin DM, Mogg A, Eranti S, Pluck G, Purvis R, Edwards D, Landau S, Brown R, Rabe-Heskith S, Howard R, Philpot M, Rothwell J, Romeo R, Knapp M. The clinical effectiveness and cost of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus electroconvulsive therapy in severe depression: a multicentre pragmatic randomised controlled trial and economic analysis. Health Technol Assess. 2007 Jul; 11(24): 1-54.
  30. Minichino A, Bersani FS, Capra E et al. ECT, rTMS, and deep TMS in pharmacoresistant drug-free patients with unipolar depression: a comparative review. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2012; 8:55-64.
  31. Miyasaki JM, Shannon K, Voon V et al. Practice parameter: Evaluation and treatment of depression, psychosis and dementia in Parkinson disease (an evidence-based review). American Academy of Neurology 2006; 66 (7): 996-1002.
  32. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Depression in adults: The treatment and management of depression in adults, Oct 2009.
  33. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for severe depression, Nov 2007.
  34. New Directions Behavioral Health Medical Policy Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment of Major Depression, 2014.
  35. New England Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council (CEPAC). Coverage Policy Analysis: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Completed by: the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), June 2012.
  36. O’Reardon JP, Solvason HB, Janicak PG et al. Efficacy and safety of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the acute treatment of major depression: a multisite randomized controlled trial. Biological Psychiatry 2007; 62(11): 1208-1216.
  37. Sachdev PS, Loo CK, Mitchell PB et al. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder: a double-blind controlled investigation Psychological Medicine 2007; 37(11): 1645-1649.
  38. Schutter DJ. Antidepressant efficacy of high-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in double-blind sham-controlled designs: a meta-analysis Psychological Medicine 2009; 39(1): 65-75.
  39. Tranulis C, Sepehry AA, Galinowski A et al. Should we treat auditory hallucinations with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation? A metaanalysis Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 2008; 53(9): 577-586.

COMMITTEE APPROVAL:

This Medical Coverage Guideline (MCG) was approved by the BCBSF Medical Policy & Coverage Committee on 08/27/15.

GUIDELINE UPDATE INFORMATION:

06/15/02

New Medical Coverage Guideline.

06/15/03

Reviewed; no change in coverage.

06/15/04

Review and revision to guideline; consisting of updated references and various changes.

07/15/05

Review and revision of guideline; consisting of updated references.

06/15/06

Review and revision of guideline; consisting of updated references.

07/01/06

HCPCS coding update; consisting of the addition of 0160T and 0161T and the deletion of 0018T.

07/15/07

Review and revision of guideline; consisting of updated references and reformatted guideline.

04/15/08

Review and revision of guideline; consisting of updated references.

05/15/09

Updated description section. No change in position statement. Updated references.

01/01/11

Annual HCPCS coding update: deleted 0160T and 0161T. Added 90867 and 90868.

05/15/11

Scheduled review; no change in position statement. Updated references.

01/01/12

Annual HCPCS coding update; added 90869 and revised 90867 and 90868 code descriptor.

10/15/12

Added program exception for Medicare Advantage products; CPT code 90867, 90868 and 90869 is considered not medically reasonable and necessary; considered a non-covered service.

06/15/13

Scheduled review. Revised position statement; added “including repetitive TMS (rTMS) and “for all indications to TMS position statement. Revised experimental or investigational rationale, added “there is insufficient published evidence in the published peer-reviewed literature regarding the long-term effect of TMS on health outcomes”. Added position statement for navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) (experimental or investigational). Updated description and references.

10/15/13

Updated program exception for Medicare Advantage products; added LCD title Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Major Depressive Disorder.

10/15/14

Scheduled review. Revised position statement; added indication and criteria for TMS. Added definition for major depression. Updated references.

11/15/14

Revised; treatment course, depression rating scale table, documentation, training and other requirements. Updated references.

09/15/15

Annual review; deleted “and/or BPAD depressed” from failure of trial of an evidenced based psychotherapy statement and updated references.

11/01/15

Revision: ICD-9 Codes deleted.

Private Property of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida.
This medical policy (medical coverage guideline) is copyright 2013, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSF). All Rights Reserved. You may not copy or use this document or disclose its contents without the express written permission of BCBSF. The medical codes referenced in this document may be proprietary and owned by others. BCBSF makes no claim of ownership of such codes. Our use of such codes in this document is for explanation and guidance and should not be construed as a license for their use by you. Before utilizing the codes, please be sure that to the extent required, you have secured any appropriate licenses for such use. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. No fee schedules, basic units, relative values, or related listings are included in CPT. The AMA assumes no liability for the data contained herein. Applicable FARS/DFARS restrictions apply to government use. CPT® is a trademark of the American Medical Association.The use of specific product names is illustrative only. It is not intended to be a recommendation of one product over another, and is not intended to represent a complete listing of all products available.

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Date Printed: May 3, 2016: 07:53 PM