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This medical policy (medical coverage guideline) is Copyright 2017, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSF). All Rights Reserved. You may not copy or use this document or disclose its contents without the express written permission of BCBSF. The medical codes referenced in this document may be proprietary and owned by others. BCBSF makes no claim of ownership of such codes. Our use of such codes in this document is for explanation and guidance and should not be construed as a license for their use by you. Before utilizing the codes, please be sure that to the extent required, you have secured any appropriate licenses for such use. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. No fee schedules, basic units, relative values, or related listings are included in CPT. The AMA assumes no liability for the data contained herein. Applicable FARS/DFARS restrictions apply to government use. CPT® is a trademark of the American Medical Association. The use of specific product names is illustrative only. It is not intended to be a recommendation of one product over another, and is not intended to represent a complete listing of all products available.

02-61000-04

Original Effective Date: 09/15/02

Reviewed: 04/25/13

Revised: 09/15/15

Subject: Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS)

THIS MEDICAL COVERAGE GUIDELINE IS NOT AN AUTHORIZATION, CERTIFICATION, EXPLANATION OF BENEFITS, OR A GUARANTEE OF PAYMENT, NOR DOES IT SUBSTITUTE FOR OR CONSTITUTE MEDICAL ADVICE. ALL MEDICAL DECISIONS ARE SOLELY THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PATIENT AND PHYSICIAN. BENEFITS ARE DETERMINED BY THE GROUP CONTRACT, MEMBER BENEFIT BOOKLET, AND/OR INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER CERTIFICATE IN EFFECT AT THE TIME SERVICES WERE RENDERED. THIS MEDICAL COVERAGE GUIDELINE APPLIES TO ALL LINES OF BUSINESS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN THE PROGRAM EXCEPTIONS SECTION.

           
Position Statement Billing/Coding Reimbursement Program Exceptions Definitions Related Guidelines
           
Other References Updates    
           

DESCRIPTION:

TENS devices consist of an electrical pulse generator, usually battery-operated, connected by wire to 2 or more electrodes, which are applied to the surface of the skin at the site of the pain. Since 1977, a large number of devices have received marketing clearance through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) process. Marketing clearance via the 510(k) process does not require data regarding clinical efficacy; these devices are considered substantially equivalent to predicate devices marketed in interstate commerce prior to May 1976, the enactment date of the Medical Device Amendments, or to devices that have been reclassified and do not require approval of a premarket approval application (PMA).

The BioniCare Bio-1000™ stimulator is a device that has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) marketing clearances to deliver pulsed electrical stimulation for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee and rheumatoid arthritis of the hand. The FDA gave the BioniCare Bio-1000™ clearance after finding it to be substantially equivalent to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices. The BioniCare system consists of an electronic stimulator device with electrical leads that are placed over the affected area and held in place with a lightweight, flexible wrap and Velcro fasteners. The battery-powered device delivers small pulsed electrical currents of 0.0 to 12.0 volt output. It is recommended that the device be worn for at least 6 hours per day and patients are reported to often wear the device while sleeping. The BioniCare system is contraindicated in patients with demand-type pacemakers and may interfere with other electronic devices.

The ReBuilder® stimulator is a device that has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) marketing clearance as a prescription device for the following uses: relaxation of muscle spasms, prevention or retardation of disuse atrophy, increasing local blood circulation, muscle reeducation, immediate post-surgical stimulation of calf muscles to prevent venous thrombosis, maintaining or increasing range of motion, symptomatic relief of chronic intractable pain, and post-traumatic and post-surgical pain relief. The FDA found the ReBuilder® to be substantially equivalent to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) devices. The ReBuilder® system consists of an electrical stimulator with lead wires that may be used with conductive garments (gloves, socks or a sleeve), and/or a footbath. The conductive garments are moistened with water and an electrolyte solution. If the footbath is used, the electrolyte solution is added to the water. The ReBuilder® features analysis of waveforms through its internal microprocessor.

Interferential stimulation (IFS) is a type of electrical stimulation. It is believed that IFS permeates the tissues more effectively and thus is more comfortable than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Interferential stimulation has been investigated as a technique to reduce pain, improve range of motion, or promote local healing following various tissue injuries.

Interferential stimulation (IFS) uses paired electrodes of 2 independent circuits carrying high-frequency (4,000 Hz) and medium-frequency (150 Hz) alternating currents. The superficial electrodes are aligned on the skin around the affected area. It is believed that IFS permeates the tissues more effectively and, with less unwanted stimulation of cutaneous nerves, is more comfortable than transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS). There are no standardized protocols for the use of interferential therapy; the therapy may vary according to the frequency of stimulation, the pulse duration, treatment time, and electrode-placement technique.

POSITION STATEMENT:

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS)

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS) meets the definition for medical necessity for the following indications:

Conductive Garments

A conductive garment (E0731) used with a TENS unit meets the definition of medical necessity when the conductive garment is FDA approved, prescribed by a physician, and when one or more of the following conditions exist:

TENS is considered experimental or investigational, as there is insufficient clinical evidence to support the use of TENS for the following indications:

There is insufficient scientific evidence to permit conclusions regarding the effects of TENS in the treatment of the above indications, on health outcomes.

Electrical stimulation (e.g. Bionicare) is considered experimental or investigational, as there is insufficient clinical evidence to support the use of electrical stimulation for the treatment of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. There is insufficient evidence to indicate the use of electrical/electromagnetic stimulation for the treatment of arthritis will result in improvements in health outcomes.

The ReBuilder® system does not meet the definition of medical necessity, as there is insufficient published clinical evidence that demonstrates this device is more effective than standard TENS devices.

Interferential stimulation (IFS)

Interferential current stimulation is considered experimental or investigational for treatment of pain. The available scientific evidence remains insufficient to permit conclusions concerning the effect of this technology on net health outcomes.

BILLING/CODING INFORMATION:

CPT Coding

There are no specific CPT codes describing interferential current stimulation. The following CPT codes might be used:

HCPCS Coding:

A4556

Electrodes (e.g., apnea monitor), per pair

A4557

Lead wires (e.g., apnea monitor), per pair

A4558

Conductive gel or paste, for use with electrical device (e.g., TENS, NMES), per oz

A4595

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) device supplies, 2 lead, per month

A4630

Replacement batteries, medically necessary, transcutaneous electrical stimulator, owned by patient

E0720

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS) device, two lead, localized stimulation

E0730

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) device, four or more leads, for multiple nerve stimulation

E0731

Form fitting conductive garment for delivery of TENS

E0762

Transcutaneous electrical joint stimulation device system, includes all accessories (investigational)

E0765

FDA-approved nerve stimulator, with replacement batteries, for treatment of nausea and vomiting (investigational)

S8130

Interferential current stimulator, 2-channel (investigational)

S8131

Interferential current stimulator, 4-channel (investigational)

REIMBURSEMENT INFORMATION:

TENS units are typically used in the home following initial application in the physician’s office, therefore, reimbursement for procedure code 64550, the application of surface (transcutaneous) neurostimulator, is limited to one (1) application in a 12-month period.

NOTE: 64550 should not be billed in addition to physical therapy service 97032.

Supplies for Rented TENS Units

The reimbursement for supplies used with a rented TENS unit is included in the rental allowance and includes the following:

Supplies for Purchased TENS Units

If the TENS unit (E0720 or E0730) is purchased, the initial allowance includes lead wires and one month’s supply of electrodes, conductive paste or gel (if needed), and batteries.

A separate allowance is made for medically necessary replacement supplies used with a purchased TENS unit. Reimbursement for TENS supplies is limited to one unit of A4595 per month for a 2-lead TENS and two units of A4595 per month for a 4-lead TENS.

Replacement of electrodes (A4556) is limited to four (4) units per month.

Replacement of damaged lead wires (A4557) is rarely medically necessary more frequently than every 12 months; therefore, reimbursement for code A4557 is limited to one (1) unit per 12-month period.

Replacement of the battery (A4630) is limited to one (1) unit per month.

Reimbursement for A4595 includes the following:

Other Supplies

No separate or additional reimbursement is made for the following supply items:

Services in excess of these limitations require documentation of medical necessity (e.g. a new condition or injury: an extended interruption in treatment).

LOINC Codes:

The following information may be required documentation to support medical necessity: physician history and physical, physician progress notes, treatment plan, and radiology reports (if applicable).

Documentation Table

LOINC Codes

LOINC
Time Frame
Modifier Code

LOINC Time Frame Modifier Codes Narrative

Physician history and physical

28626-0

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim

Attending physician visit note

18733-6

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

Treatment plan

18776-5

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim.

Radiology report

18726-0

18805-2

Include all data of the selected type that represents observations made six months or fewer before starting date of service for the claim

PROGRAM EXCEPTIONS:

Federal Employee Program (FEP): Follow FEP guidelines.

State Account Organization (SAO): Follow SAO guidelines.

Medicare Advantage Products:

The following National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) located at www.cms.gov were reviewed on the last guideline reviewed date:

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for Acute Post-Operative Pain (10.2)

Treatment of Motor Function Disorders with Electric Nerve Stimulation (160.2)

Electrical Nerve Stimulators (160.7)

Assessing Patient's Suitability for Electrical Nerve Stimulation Therapy (160.7.1)

Supplies Used in the Delivery of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) (160.13)

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators (TENS) (280.13)

The following Durable Medical Equipment Regional Carrier (DMERC) Local Coverage Determination (LCD) located at www.cgsmedicare.com was reviewed on the last guideline reviewed date:

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators (TENS) (L5031)

DEFINITIONS:

TENS (transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation): a small battery powered electronic device used for the treatment of pain. An electrode attaches to the skin near the painful area and sends a signal to the brain that competes with “pain signals” from the painful area, resulting in less perception of pain by the brain. These devices do not treat the cause of the pain, but decreases the brain’s sensation of the pain.

PENS (percutaneous electric nerve stimulation): similar to TENS except that instead of electrodes attached to the skin, a needle is inserted into the site of pain.

RELATED GUIDELINES:

Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Dysfunction; Diagnosis and Treatment, 02-20000-12
Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (PENS), 02-61000-03

OTHER:

None applicable.

REFERENCES:

  1. AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse. Guideline Summary NGC-7160. American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Chronic pain. 2008.
  2. AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse. Guideline Summary NGC-8519. Work Loss Data Institute. Pain (chronic). 2011.
  3. American Academy of Neurology Assessment: Efficacy of Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Pain in Neurologic Disorders (2009). Accessed at www.aan.com on 03/28/13.
  4. American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ACOG (American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology) Practice Bulletin: nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Apr;103(4):803-14.
  5. Bjordal JM, Johnson MI, Lopes-Martins RA, Bogen B, Chow R, Ljunggren AE. Short-term efficacy of physical interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2007 Jun 22; 8:51. Review.
  6. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association TEC Assessments, (performed 1988; 1996).
  7. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Medical Policy Reference Manual. 1.01.09 Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator (TENS). August 2012.
  8. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Medical Policy Reference Manual. 1.01.27 Electrical/Electromagnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Arthritis. 01/10/08.
  9. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Medical Policy Reference Manual. 1.01.24 Interferential Stimulation for Treatment of Pain. November 2010.
  10. Brosseau L, Wells GA, Finestone HM, Egan M, Dubouloz CJ, Graham I, Casimiro L, Robinson VA, Bilodeau M, McGowan J. Clinical practice guidelines for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Top Stroke Rehabil 2006 Spring; 13(2):61-3.
  11. Brosseau L, Yonge KA, Robinson V, Marchand S, Judd M, Wells G, Tugwell P. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD004377. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004377.
  12. Carroll D, Moore RA, McQuay HJ, Fairman F, Tramèr M, Leijon G. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2000, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003222. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003222.
  13. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Public Agenda Payment and Coding Determinations for New Durable Medical Equipment. June 30, 2004. Agenda item #5. “Request to establish a code for a chondrogenesis system, Trade Name: BioniCare® Stimulator, Model BIO-1000™.
  14. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Manual System, Pub. 100-3, Medicare National Coverage, Chapter 1, Part 1, Section 10.2 Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for Acute Post-Operative Pain, (08/07/95). (Accessed 01/09/12).
  15. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Manual System, Pub. 100-3, Medicare National Coverage, Chapter 1, Part 2, Section 160.13 Supplies Used in the Delivery of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES), (08/07/95) (Accessed 01/09/12).
  16. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Manual System, Pub. 100-3, Medicare National Coverage, Chapter 1, Part 2, Section 160.2 Treatment of Motor Function Disorders with Electric Nerve Stimulation, (04/01/03).
  17. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Manual System, Pub. 100-3, Medicare National Coverage, Chapter 1, Part 2, Section 160.7.1 Assessing Patient's Suitability for Electrical Nerve Stimulation Therapy, (06/19/06). (Accessed 01/09/12).
  18. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Manual System, Pub. 100-3, Medicare National Coverage, Chapter 1, Part 4, Section 280.13 Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators (TENS), (08/07/95).
  19. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Region C DMERC Local Carrier Determination (LCD) for Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators (TENS) (L5031) (08/04/11).
  20. Chou R, Huffman LH; American Pain Society; American College of Physicians. Nonpharmacologic therapies for acute and chronic low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society/American College of Physicians clinical practice guideline. Ann Intern Med. 2007 Oct 2; 147(7): 492-504. Review.
  21. Chou R, Qaseem A, Snow V, Casey D, Cross JT Jr, Shekelle P, Owens DK; Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee of the American College of Physicians; American College of Physicians; American Pain Society Low Back Pain Guidelines Panel. Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: a joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society. Ann Intern Med. 2007 Oct 2; 147(7): 478-91.
  22. Cruccu G, Aziz TZ, Garcia-Larrea L, Hansson P, Jensen TS, Lefaucheur JP, Simpson BA, Taylor RS. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain. Eur J Neurol 2007 Sep;14(9):952-70.
  23. Dubinsky R M, Miyasaki J. Assessment: Efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of pain in neurologic disorders (an evidence-based review). Report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology® 2010; 74: 173–176.
  24. ECRI Custom Hotline Response. Transcutaneous Electrical Joint Stimulation for Knee Osteoarthritis. Plymouth Meeting, PA: ECRI. Updated 08/16/07.
  25. ECRI Custom Hotline Response. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Back Pain. Plymouth Meeting, PA: ECRI. Updated 02/05/08.
  26. ECRI Target Database. Transcutaneous electrical joint stimulation for knee osteoarthritis. Plymouth Meeting, PA: ECRI. (Target report 890/January 2006).
  27. Eyigör S, Karapolat H, Ibisoğlu U, Durmaz B. [Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or therapeutic ultrasound increase the effectiveness of exercise for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled study.] Agri. 2008 Jan; 20(1): 32-40. Turkish.
  28. Fary RE, Carroll GJ, Briffa TG, Gupta R, Briffa NK. The effectiveness of pulsed electrical stimulation (E-PES) in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008 Feb 4; 9:18.
  29. Florida Medicare Part B Local Coverage Determination. LCD 29289 Therapy and Rehabilitation Services. 01/01/12.
  30. Fuentes J, Armijo-Olivo S, Mageeb DJ, Gross DP. A preliminary investigation into the effects of active interferential current therapy and placebo on pressure pain sensitivity: a random crossover placebo controlled study. Physiotherapy 97 (2011) 291–301.
  31. Fuentes J, Armijo-Olivo S, Mageeb DJ, Gross DP. Effectiveness of Interferential Current Therapy in the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Physical Therapy Volume 90 Number 9 September 2010.
  32. Hayes, Inc. HAYES Alert. Pulsed Electrical Stimulation for Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Lansdale, PA: Hayes, Inc.; Feb 2005.
  33. Hayes, Inc. HAYES Medical Technology Directory: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for the Treatment of Pain Lansdale, PA: Hayes, Inc.; 08/31/00. Update performed 08/11/06.
  34. Hayes, Inc. HAYES Medical Technology Directory: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting Lansdale, PA: Hayes, Inc.; 02/05/06. Update performed 03/30/08.
  35. Hayes, Inc., Health Technology Brief. BioniCare® Bio-1000™ System (BioniCare Medical Technologies Inc.) for Osteoarthritis of the Knee, Lansdale, PA: Hayes, Inc.; 04/20/05. Update performed 11/24/07.
  36. InterQual® 2011. Durable Medical Equipment. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS).
  37. Kara B, BaSkurt F, Acar S, KaradIb D, Erbayraktar S, Gokmen AN. The Effect of TENS on Pain, Function, Depression, and Analgesic Consumption in the Early Postoperative Period with Spinal Surgery Patients. Turkish Neurosurgery 2011, Vol: 21, No: 4, 618-624.
  38. Khadilkar A, Milne S, Brosseau L, Robinson V, Saginur M, Shea B, Tugwell P, Wells G. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2005, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD003008. DOI: 10.1002/14651858. CD003008.pub2.
  39. McCarthy CJ, Callaghan MJ, Oldham JA. Pulsed electromagnetic energy treatment offers no clinical benefit in reducing the pain of knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006 Jun 15; 7:51. Review.
  40. Medicare DME MAC, Jurisdiction C. Local Coverage Determination. L5031 Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulators (TENS), 03/01/08.
  41. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. What is Back Pain? Updated September 2009.
  42. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Low Back Pain Fact Sheet. July 2003. Last updated December 21, 2009.
  43. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Pain: Hope Through Research. December 2001. Last updated December 21, 2009.
  44. Norrbrink C. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of spinal cord injury neuropathic pain. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2009; 46(1): 85-93.
  45. North American Spine Society Phase lll: Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care Specialists, 12/06 update.
  46. Osiri M, Welch V, Brosseau L, Shea B, McGowan J, Tugwell P, Wells G. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for knee osteoarthritis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2000, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD002823. DOI: 10.1002/14651858. CD002823.
  47. Rosen T, de Veciana M, Miller HS, et al. A randomized controlled trial of nerve stimulation for relief of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Jul;102(1):129-35.
  48. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) Summary K030332. June 6, 2003. “BioniCare® Stimulator, Model BIO-1000™.
  49. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) Summary K874085. “ReBuilder® Stimulator”. December 11, 1987. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  50. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) Summary K882980. “ReBuilder® EMS/TENS Stimulator”. April 24, 1989. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  51. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Warning Letter ReBuilder Medical Technologies, Inc. July 16, 2008. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  52. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Warning Letter ReBuilder Medical Technologies, Inc. March 8, 2011. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  53. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MAUDE Adverse Event Report MW5007544: Rebuilder Medical Technology, Inc.; ReBuilder One. May 10, 2008. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  54. United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MAUDE Adverse Event Report MW5009620: Rebuilder Medical Technology, Inc.; The ReBuilder TENS Unit. January 1, 2009. Accessed at http://www.fda.gov/ on 03/28/13.
  55. White PF, Issioui T, Hu J, et al. Comparative efficacy of acustimulation (ReliefBand) versus ondansetron (Zofran) in combination with droperidol for preventing nausea and vomiting. Anesthesiology. 2002 Nov;97(5):1075-81.

COMMITTEE APPROVAL:

This Medical Coverage Guideline (MCG) was approved by the BCBSF Medical Policy & Coverage Committee on 04/25/13.

GUIDELINE UPDATE INFORMATION:

09/15/02

Medical Coverage Guideline Reformatted and Revised.

01/01/03

HCPCS coding update.

08/15/03

HCPCS coding update consisting of the addition of code E0765.

11/15/03

Review and revision of guideline consisting of updated references.

01/01/04

Annual HCPCS coding update.

09/15/04

Unscheduled review and revision of guideline; consisting of updated references, and various formatting changes; information on Bionicare device added.

03/15/05

Revision of guideline; consisting of addition of EMSI IF-5000.

01/01/06

Annual HCPCS update consisting of the addition of E0762 and the revision of A4630.

08/15/06

Scheduled review and revision of guideline consisting of updated references.

01/01/07

HCPCS coding update consisting of the revision of A4558, E0720 and E0730.

07/15/07

Annual review, current coverage and limitations maintained, reformatted guideline, references updated.

07/15/08

Review and revision of guideline consisting of updated references.

06/15/09

Scheduled review; no change in position statement. Update references.

01/01/10

Annual HCPCS coding update: remove reference to HCPCS code A4365.

04/15/10

Annual review; no change in position statement. Update references.

05/15/10

Review with revision to position statement to add nausea and vomiting of pregnancy as an experimental or investigational use for electric stimulation. References updated.

09/15/11

Revision; formatting changes.

02/15/12

Annual review; added coverage statement for interferential stimulation (E/I). Updated description section, CPT coding section, HCPCS coding section, reimbursement information and references.

11/15/12

Revision; revised reimbursement section regarding code 64550.

05/15/13

Revision; revised description section and position statement. Updated references.

09/15/15

Revision; updated Reimbursement Information section.

Date Printed: June 28, 2017: 11:56 PM